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Eviction Frequently Asked Questions (FAQ)

This information is only certain to be true in the Antelope Valley of California. While these FAQs are generally true, they have not been checked against such things as local county or local court rules except in the Antelope Valley.  If you are anywhere other than in the Antelope Valley, you should check with local counsel before making any plans based on this information.

  1. What is a lawsuit?
  2. A lawsuit is the procedure by which we get to collect the property of other people and we get our property returned to us. In an eviction, we seek the rent you are owed and the return of your rental property.

  3. What do these legal terms mean?
    • In a lawsuit the "Plaintiff" is the person who files the suit and the "Defendant" is the person who is sued. For an eviction the landlord is the Plaintiff and the tenant is the Defendant.
    • "Unlawful Detainer" is the legal term for an eviction suit. "UD" is slang for Unlawful Detainer.
    • A "Process Server" is a person whose job it is to serve lawsuits.
    • "Case Number" is the identification number for the lawsuit. Every lawsuit has a unique number.
    • "Summons" is a document that must be delivered to the Defendant, it tells him or her that they have been sued.
    • "Complaint" is a document that must be delivered to the Defendant, it tells him or her why they were sued.
    • "Default" is a legal term for the status of a defendant in a lawsuit where they have been served and not answered. We must request the court enter the tenant's default. Once a tenant's default has been entered the tenant must receive the court's permission before they may respond to the suit.
    • "Answer" is the document filed by the Defendant that is supposed to set forth his or her defenses to the suit, although it often does not. If this document is filed with the court, then we will have to have a trial (See FAQ "What is a Trial?"). The Defendant has either five or fifteen days after service to file this document with the court.
    • "Judgment" is the decision of the court. For an eviction this is the decision that you are entitled to possession of your property and usually your back rent.
    • "Possession only Judgment" is a decision of the court wherein the court only awards possession of your property, but not money.
    • "Writ" this is the document by which the court instructs the Sheriff to perform the lockout of your tenant.
    • "Sheriff Instructions" are the instructions from Charlton Weeks LLP to the Sheriff to perform the lock out.
    • This is not a complete list of documents.

  4. Why do I have to file a lawsuit?
    • There are only two ways you can legally get possession of your rental property. Either the tenant returns possession to you or the Sheriff returns possession to you. The Sheriff will only return possession to you when directed to do so by the court.

  5. What if I physically force the tenant to move out?
    • This is a crime and is also a trespass, for which you can be sued by the tenant. While you own the property, since you voluntarily allowed the tenant to move into the property, you can only get possession of the property back from the tenant by either the tenant voluntarily returning the property to you or by the Sheriff returning the property to you.

  6. What right does the landlord have to enter the rental unit?
    • The landlord may enter into the property at any time with the tenants agreement.
    • The landlord may enter the property after giving reasonable written notice. Twenty four hours is reasonable. Charlton Weeks LLP suggests that you always give at least twenty four hours notice. Some circumstances may even allow no notice, for example if the property has flooded. The notice should be posted on the door.
    • The landlord may only enter onto the property for a legitimate reason, for example to inspect the property for damage, repairs, fire alarms, or to show it for sale. If the tenant refuses to allow the landlord to enter onto the property, the tenant can be evicted for this refusal (which means if you are already evicting the tenant, there is not much you can do).
    • If the landlord improperly enters the property the tenant can sue the landlord for trespass.

  7. Do I have to file an eviction if my tenant moved out but has allowed another person to move in?
    • Yes, since that person was voluntarily allowed to move in, that person must either voluntarily move out or you must have the Sheriff move them out. In this case it would be your tenant's responsibility to evict this person and your tenant would have right and obligation to perform the eviction. Unfortunately, most tenants in this position shirk this duty.

  8. Can I remove the doors, windows, or turn off the electricity to the property?
    • No. If you do any of these actions the penalty which can be imposed by the court is $100.00 per day. The law prohibits the landlord from doing any of these actions and most other actions that reduces the usefulness of the rental unit.

  9. Do I have to continue to pay the utilities of the rental unit?
    • This depends on your contract with your tenant. If you agreed to pay the utilities you cannot stop paying them because you want the tenant out of the property. If you never promised to pay the utilities, you are under no obligation to pay for the utilities merely because the tenant has chosen not to pay.

  10. What if the tenant dies?
    • A month to month tenancy terminates thirty days after the last day the deceased tenant paid rent. Tenancies for a period of time continue pursuant to their terms.

  11. How is an eviction lawsuit different from other types of lawsuits?
    • There is little difference between an eviction lawsuit and other civil lawsuits. There are some procedural rules that are different. The most important one being that the court is supposed to set the eviction trial within twenty days after request. At Charlton Weeks LLP we request trial as soon as possible.

  12. When can I file an eviction lawsuit?
    • Eviction lawsuits can only be brought when the tenant has broken their contract with the landlord.

  13. Do I have to give a notice to the tenant before I can sue them for eviction?
    • In most cases, when the tenant has broken the contract the landlord must give the tenant notice of the broken contract before filing the lawsuit.
    • One exception to this is if the tenant is in the property pursuant to an agreement for a specific period of time. If the tenant does not move out of the property when the lease expires, the lawsuit may be brought after a 30 day notice is given.

  14. What type of eviction notices are there?
  15. The law does not specifically identify notices, but the following is a list of common names:

    • Three Day Notice to Pay Rent or Quit.
    • Three Day Notice to Cure or Quit.
    • Three Day Notice to Quit.
    • Thirty Day Notice to Quit.
    • Sixty Day Notice to Quit.

  16. How is a Notice served?
    • A notice may be served by any adult. The notice must be served by one of the following methods. If the notice is not served by one the following methods, it is void.
    • Personal Service. The notice is delivered to the tenant in person.
    • Substitute Service. The notice is delivered to another adult on the property and mailed to the tenant.
    • Posting Service. The notice is posted on the door and mailed.
    • Please note, that in the second two methods of service, the notice is mailed. If you are uncertain, there is no harm in mailing. The notice is only required to be mailed by first class mail, certified or regular mail is not necessary.

  17. What is a Three Day Notice to Pay Rent or Quit?
    • This notice must be served when the tenant has failed to pay the rent. The tenant must pay the amount demanded or move out of the property within three days. If the third day falls on a weekend or holiday, then the tenant has until the following business day.
    • This notice is void if it demands more rent than is due. This notice must contain numerous other disclosures. Charlton Weeks LLP will prepare and serve a notice for you as a part of the eviction.

  18. What is a Three Day Notice to Cure or Quit?
    • This notice must be served when the tenant has failed to comply with a term of the rental agreement between you and the tenant, and in some cases, broken the law.
    • The tenant must cease breaking the contract within three days or vacate the property. Common reasons for a Three Day Cure or Quit is a pet in the rental unit or more people living in the rental unit than is allowed under the rental agreement. Since late charges cannot be demanded on the Three Day Notice to Pay Rent of Quit, if the landlord wants to start an eviction based upon non-payment of a late charge, the proper notice to give is a Three Day Cure or Quit, with the item to cure being the payment of the late charge.
    • If the matter goes to trial, the landlord must prove that the tenant was in breach of the lease at the time the notice was served and failed to stop the breach within the three day period. Therefore, the Three Day Cure or Quit is the inappropriate notice to give for intermittent problems such as loud music or drug sales. See "What is a Three Day Quit"

  19. What is a Three Day Notice to Quit?
    • This notice must be served when the tenant has failed to comply with a term of the rental agreement and by law is not entitled to fix that breach. The tenant is required to move out of the property within three days.
    • The most common example is commission of a crime or giving the rental property to another person. Another common use of this notice is when the tenant is intermittently breaching the lease.
    • The law does not require that the landlord give advance notice before serving a Three Day Notice to Quit. However, in court the landlord will be obligated to prove that the tenant has been breaching the lease in an intermittent manner such that a Three Day Notice to Quit is reasonable. It is suggested that for intermittent breaches of the lease, such as constant loud music or excess persons on the property, at least three letters be sent to the tenant warning the tenant that if the conduct continues, the landlord will serve a Notice to Quit.
    • Serious violations, such as a commission of a crime, do not need such notices.

  20. What is a Thirty Day Notice to Quit?
    • This notice demands the tenant vacate the property within thirty days. The landlord is not obligated to offer any reason for issuing this notice. See "When does the three days expire in a three day notice" for how to calculate the expiration of this notice. This notice may be served in any way a Three Day Notice can be served and it can also be served by registered mail.
    • One of the advantages of this notice is that common tenant defenses are not available to evictions based upon this type of notice. For example, defenses based on the condition of the property are not allowed.

  21. Can I serve a thirty or sixty day notice before the expiration of the lease?
    • If the tenant lives in the property pursuant to a term lease, for example a one year lease, then the landlord cannot serve a notice for the tenant to vacate the property unless the tenant has broken the lease. Once the lease has expired the landlord does not have to serve a notice before filing the eviction. If the landlord accepts rent, then the lease continues on a month to month (if the rent is paid monthly and the lease does not state to the contrary) basis. In that case the landlord may serve a thirty day notice.

  22. Does a lease remain in effect after it expires?
    • li>Yes. The only difference is that the term of a lease after it expires is month to month, unless the rent is paid in more often intervals or the lease states to the contrary.

  23. When does the three days expire in a three day notice?
    • The first day of a three day notice is the day after you served the notice. Service is when the last act necessary for service is performed. For example, if the notice was posted on Tuesday and mailed on Wednesday, the notice was served on Wednesday.
    • The third day of the three day notice is three days after the day the notice was served. For example, if the notice was served on Monday, third day is Thursday and expires that day.
    • If the third day falls on a day that is not a business day, then, by operation of law, that day is not counted. Non-business days are counted unless they are the third day.
    • For example, if a three day notice is served on Wednesday, then the first day would fall on Thursday and the third day would fall on Saturday. Since Saturday is a non-business day, then that day is not counted and neither is Sunday. The third day would be Monday. If Monday was a holiday, then the third day would be Tuesday.
    • For example, if a three day notice was served on Friday, the first day would be Saturday and the third day would be Monday.
    • In all cases, suit can be filed the day after the notice expires, the third day.

  24. What happens if the tenant offers the rent before the three day notice expires?
    • If the tenant offers all the rent demanded in the notice before the notice expires, the tenant has complied with the notice. If the landlord refuses the rent, an eviction cannot be brought based upon that notice.

  25. What happens if the tenant offers less rent than required under the three day notice?
    • The landlord is not penalized for refusing less than the rent demanded in the three day notice. If the landlord accepts rent, even if it is less than the amount demanded, then an eviction cannot be brought based upon that notice.

  26. Why do tenants get to stay in the property when they owe the rent?
    • We understand that getting possession of your property as soon as possible is most important. All actions we take are to achieve this goal. Our legislature has given tenants the right to stay in the property even if they have not paid the rent. In California the only way to get possession of your property is if the tenant voluntarily returns possession to you or if the Sheriff returns possession to you. Before the Sheriff will return possession to you, we must go through the court process. The legislature designed this process to take time.

  27. Prejudgement claim of right to possession?
    • When the Sheriff serves the tenants the eviction notice, they also serve a form called a "Claim of Right to Possession" on the rental property. This gives persons other than the tenants named in the eviction suit notice of the eviction and notice that they can now claim to be a tenant. If a person then makes this claim, a whole new trial will need to be performed regarding that person. Usually that person is a relative and was never a tenant. The purpose is always to stall the eviction.
    • A Prejudgment Claim of Right to Possession is the name of a form that we have the Process Server serve on the rental unit. This prevents a person from claiming later that they were a tenant in the property. This prevents surprises at the lock out and reduces the average time of evictions. We do this for you free of charge.

  28. What does it mean to "serve" the lawsuit?
    • The law requires that all lawsuits be delivered to the defendant. "Served" is the legal term for delivery.
    • A lawsuit is served by delivery to the tenant. Another name for the lawsuit is "process." Which is why the person who delivers the papers to the tenant is called a "Process Server."

  29. Why does service of the lawsuit take time?
    • The lawsuit cannot be served until we have filed the suit with the court, the court has processed the suit, and returned it to us for service. It usually takes the court about a day to process the suit and return it to our Process Server. Our Process Server then will go to the rental property or other address you have given us.
    • The Process Server must make at least three attempts on three different days to serve the tenant. If on the third or subsequent attempt any adult is on the property that person may be delivered the lawsuit.
    • If no adult is found on the property, then we apply to the court for permission to post a copy of the lawsuit on the door. Once we receive that permission from the court, the Process Server posts the suit on the door and the suit is considered served on that day.

  30. Can the tenant be served if they don't answer the door?
    • No. In order for a service to count, the Process Server must make eye contact with the tenant and indicate to them they have the lawsuit. Therefore, if the tenant does not answer the door, the suit is not served. It is not uncommon for tenants to refuse to answer the door when they know they have been sued for eviction. The court also mails the tenant notice they have been sued, so they are often aware the Process Server is coming.
    • Problems also arise where the property is surrounded by a wall or only children are left on the property. In that case, after the three attempts, we apply to the court for permission to serve the lawsuit by posting it on the door.

  31. Can the tenant be served at work?
    • Yes. However, this will only count for the tenant who works at that location. If two are sued, and one works, only that tenant can be served at work, the other will need to be served at the rental property or other location.

  32. What if you cannot find the tenant and no one ever answers the door?
    • After we have made at least three different attempts at different times of the day, we can apply to the court for permission to post the lawsuit on the door of the rental unit. Since what we are asking the court for is an order, this is informally called "Order to Post" or an "OTP." The lawsuit is mailed to the tenant at the same time. We are not allowed to post it on the door until after we have received the judge's permission. It usually takes the judge about five days.
    • If we can help it, we try not to serve the tenant by posting the lawsuit on the door because the tenant gets fifteen days after the posting to respond to the suit.

  33. What if the tenant moves out after the lawsuit is filed?
    • If the tenant moves out we proceed with the suit unless you instruct us to stop the suit. Since you have possession of the property you will not need us to send the Sheriff, however you may want us to get you a money judgment
      (see FAQ "What is a money judgment?")

  34. How do I get paid for the back rent?
    • If you receive a money judgment, you are given the right to collect the amount of the money judgment from the tenant. Contact a Collection Agency.

  35. What happens if the tenant does not respond to the suit?
    • If the tenant does not respond to the suit in the time allowed by law, we send out the Sheriff.
    • For those of you who want more detail: If the tenant does not respond to the suit we take that as tenant's default. At the same time we request the court for a judgment of possession only. After we have defaulted all the tenants and received a possession only judgment, we apply to the court for a writ, and then deliver the writ and Sheriff instructions to the Sheriff. The Sheriff is instructed to lock out the tenant.

  36. What is a default and why does it matter?
    • Once a tenant has been served with the lawsuit the tenant has a certain amount of time to respond to the court. Five days if the tenant was served personally and fifteen if the tenant was served in another manner. Once the five or fifteen days have passed, we may then file with the court a "Request for Default." This is a request we make to the court to enter the tenants default. Once we have filed this request, the tenant may no longer respond to the suit, without first receiving the court's permission.
    • We generally refer to a tenant who has been defaulted as "in default." If a tenant has been defaulted, that means there will not be a trial, which saves the landlord about 25 days. Typically, we request the Sheriff lock out the tenant at the same time we request the tenant's default.
    • One issue that often arises is that we request the default of a tenant who has responded to the court. This happens when the tenant has responded, but the court records do not reflect that response. We typically do not learn of the response for about a week. At that time we immediately set the case for trial.

  37. How much time does a tenant have to answer the lawsuit after they are served?
    • Five days if the suit was delivered to them personally. Fifteen days if the suit was delivered to them by another method. Charlton Weeks LLP makes all efforts to serve the lawsuit personally.

  38. What does the tenant do after they are served with the eviction suit?
    • The tenant can ignore the suit, in which case they will be defaulted (about 66% of the time). See the FAQ on defaults. The tenant can answer the suit (about 33% of the time). See the FAQ on answers.
    • The tenant can also file bankruptcy, which is rare. See the FAQ on Bankruptcy. There are other litigations tactics available, but they are very very rare.

  39. What is an "Answer"?
    • An answer is the most common response of the tenant to the eviction suit.
    • An answer is a document wherein the tenant explains why they think the Court should decide in their favor. Tenants answer about 40% of the time. As soon as all the tenants have answered or we have defaulted them, we can set the case for trail. Charlton Weeks LLP will set the case for trial as soon as possible.

  40. How soon is trial, why does it take so long to get to trial?
    • Charlton Weeks LLP requests trial as soon as possible. We usually receive a trial date about 25 days after we request it. The court will only schedule so many trials for one day, so once that day is filled up, the trial goes to the next day. Also, due to the state budget, the court is understaffed, so the court may not be able to schedule a trial as soon as it would otherwise have, if it had a full staff.
    • Unfortunately, no procedure exists to have an earlier trial date.

  41. Does it matter what the tenant says in the "Answer." Does it matter if the tenant lies?
    • While the laws for evictions and other types of litigation are the same, those laws are implemented differently for evictions suits. This is one of those examples.
    • Judges barely, if at all, look at what the tenant's answer states. The law limits the tenant to those defenses set forth in the answer, but as a practical matter, judges do not restrict the tenant to only those defenses set forth in the answer.
    • Since this is the case, what the tenant states in the answer usually doesn't matter. Usually what the tenant states in the answer, even if it were true, would not effect the eviction case. The most common example is a claim by the tenant that the landlord refused to accept the rent. Unless the refusal took place within the three day notice period, this is irrelevant because the landlord has no obligation to accept the rent after the three day period expires.
    • For some items in the answer, we may give you a telephone call and discuss the issue. At Charlton Weeks LLP we always assume that the tenant is lying unless we hear differently from you.
    • Often the tenant will call the landlord bad names or make outlandish accusations. We sympathize with you, but rest assured, the Judge pays no attention to name calling and outlandish accusations. They have heard it all before and will forget it as fast as they pick up the next file.

  42. What ways can the tenant respond to the suit other than an answer?
    • It is very rare for a tenant to respond to the court with other than an answer. However, the tenant can also file pretrial motions or file bankruptcy. The pretrial motions always lose and are just a stalling tactic. Charlton Weeks LLP will dispose of them as fast as possible, but they will still delay the eviction for one to two weeks. For bankruptcy, see the FAQ on Bankruptcy.

  43. Tenant defenses that work - habitability?
    • The most common defense given by a tenant is that the property is not habitable. Habitable means the property was in such an inadequate condition that the law will not allow the landlord to receive the demanded rent.
    • The law does not allow a landlord to demand all or a portion of the rent if the property is not livable. There is no exclusive list, but common examples are inadequate heat, water, hot water, electricity, windows, doors, ventilation. If the property is filthy or vermin infested that would also allow the tenant to win.
    • This is such a common complaint, that the judges do not take it too seriously, unless the tenant has pictures or has a report from the health inspector.
    • Normally pictures are not too bad for the landlord. Unfortunately, an inspection from the health inspector generally is pretty bad for the landlord. The judge believes what is on the inspection report, regardless of what the truth may be.
    • If the unlivable condition was caused by the tenant or developed after the tenant moved into the property, this defense is not available to the landlord. However, the tenant will usually claim he or she told the landlord of the condition, whether they actually did or not.
    • If the judge finds the property was uninhabitable, the judge will either rule for the tenant, or require the tenant to pay a lesser rent until the condition is fixed. Either way the tenant remains in possession of the property.

  44. Tenant defenses that work - discrimination?
    • Some types of discrimination are legal. For example, discrimination against noisy tenants or tenants that are late on the rent. If the judge believes that the landlord is attempting to evict the tenant due to discrimination which is illegal (race, sex, age, number of children, religion, marital status, etc.) the landlord will lose the eviction.

  45. Tenant defenses that work - Three Day Notice Wrong?
    • If the rent demanded in the three day notice is in excess of the actual rent due, the landlord will lose. If money is demanded on the three day notice to pay rent or quit which is not rent (for example late charges) the landlord will lose. There are other required items on the three day notice as well.

  46. Tenant defenses that work - Notice not served?
    • If the landlord did not properly serve the notice, the landlord will lose.

  47. Tenant defenses that work - Receipt of Money after service of Notice?
    • If the landlord received money after service of the notice, the landlord will lose an eviction based upon that notice.

  48. Tenant defenses that work - Retaliation?
    • If the judge believes the reason the landlord seeks this eviction is to retaliate against the tenant for engaging in legally protected activities, this landlord will lose the eviction. This is very rare since most evictions are brought because the tenant did not pay the rent. For example, the landlord cannot evict a tenant because the tenant reported a crime. The landlord can retaliate against the tenant for not paying the rent or being noisy.

  49. Tenant defenses that work - Rent Control?
    • Luckily, rent control in the Antelope Valley only applies to mobile home parks. This is not a defense to other properties. Tenants often have moved from rent control properties, or have friends in rent control properties, and don't understand that there is no rent control. Some of the more bizarre tenant requests result from this misunderstanding.

  50. Tenant defenses that work - Waiver of Notice?
    • If the landlord waives the notice, then an eviction cannot be brought on that notice. The most common way to waive the notice is to accept money after it has expired.

  51. Tenant defenses that work - Repair and Deduct?
    • The tenant has the right to repair an item in the property and then deduct the cost of repair from the rent. If this amount is demanded in the notice to pay the rent, then the landlord will lose.
    • This defense is rarely successful because the repair must be necessary to remedy a condition that makes the property uninhabitable. Also, the tenant must give reasonable notice ahead of time and can only deduct one month's rent.

  52. What is a trial?
    • The eviction trial is the same as any other trial. At an eviction trial, as other trials, the Plaintiff presents evidence as to why the Defendant should be evicted. The Defendant then presents evidence as to why he or she should not be evicted. Since the relevant evidence for an eviction trial is so small, eviction trials are usually much shorter than other trials. Jury Trials are rarely held for evictions, however, they are possible.
    • Eviction trials tend to be much more informal than other trials. The current judge that hears our evictions does not require many of the formalities that are common for other trials. However, the Plaintiff must still present evidence by a knowledgeable person. This is why it is necessary for a person who has knowledge to appear with us at trial. For example, if the tenant is being evicted because of non-payment of rent, then a person who has knowledge, based upon their review of the records or because they received the rent, or the non-payment of the rent, must appear at trial.

  53. What is a money judgment?
    • Every eviction suit has two components. The first and usually most important is possession of the property. Secondly, we also seek for you all rent you are due through the date of the judgment. The second portion is commonly called a "money judgment."

  54. What do I do with the stuff the tenant leaves in the property?
    • You are required by law to store the tenant's property for fifteen days after the Sheriff performs the lock out. Most landlords prefer to store the property at the rental unit, but the law only requires that it be stored in a safe place. After the fifteenth day, you may keep or throw away all property worth less than $300.00. Property worth $300.00 or more must be auctioned pursuant to a legal procedure and the proceeds, after the cost of the auction, given to the county. The law is unclear if each item has to be worth over $299.99, or all of the property added together worth over $299.99. If you are uncertain you should have an appraiser appraise the property before throwing it away.
    • During the fifteen days, if the tenant requests return of the property, the landlord must, at a reasonable day and time, allow the tenant to remove the property. If the tenant cannot reasonably remove all the property at this time, then another time must be arranged.
    • This procedure does not apply if the tenant is not removed by the Sheriff or if someone else's property is left on the property.

  55. What do I do with the tenants property if the tenant moves out not by the Sheriff?
    • There is a separate optional procedure in this case. The landlord gives notice to the tenant of the property left at the rental unit and also describes the property. If the tenant does not retrieve the property, you may keep or throw away all property worth less than $300.00. Property worth $300.00 or more must be auctioned pursuant to a legal procedure and the proceeds, after the cost of the auction, given to the county. The law is unclear if each item has to be worth over $299.99, or all of the property added together worth over $299.99. If you are uncertain you should have an appraiser appraise the property before throwing it away.

  56. What do I do with the tenants security deposit?
    • You are entitled to deduct from the security deposit all sums you are owed by the tenant. You are required to account to the tenant for all sums you deduct, and return the balance of the security deposit to the tenant.
    • Before the tenant moves out you must give the tenant an opportunity to inspect the property with you. At this time you must list to the tenant all the items the tenant must repair, or you will deduct the cost from the security deposit.
    • Landlords are entitled to deduct the cost of repairing any item in the rental unit. However, a Landlord is not allowed to deduct "reasonable wear and tear." What is "reasonable wear and tear" depends on the circumstances. For example, repainting the rental unit after the tenant was in the unit five years would be reasonable wear and you would not be able to deduct this from the security deposit. Repainting the rental unit after a year, because the tenant was dirty, would not be reasonable wear, so you could deduct this amount from the security deposit.

  57. Where do I mail the tenants accounting and security deposit?
    • You mail this to the tenant's last known address, even if this is your rental unit.

  58. Bankruptcy?
    • A stalling tactic of tenants is to file bankruptcy, however, this is rare. Once a tenant has filed bankruptcy, we can take no further action on the eviction until after we have received permission from the bankruptcy court. It typically will take us about four weeks to receive this permission. There is an additional charge.
    • It is not required that you ask for the bankruptcy court's permission. You can wait until the bankruptcy concludes. Many bankruptcies are terminated by the bankruptcy court in a few months, but many end much later. Once the bankruptcy is over, we can restart the eviction where we left off.

This information is only certain to be true in the Antelope Valley of California. While these FAQs are generally true, they have not been checked against such things as local county or local Court rules except in the Antelope Valley. If you are anywhere other than in the Antelope Valley, you should check with local Counsel before making any plans based on this information.

Please contact us today to schedule a consultation in our Palmdale, CA law office.